Tuesday, September 9, 2014

My Recent Adventures with Fusion Collage

 I took a class in Fusion Collage taught by Kelly Alison at the Art League Houston (ALH) this summer, and since then have made these small pieces using the new method. The first couple of pieces made in class were not worth saving. All the pieces shown here were more or less experiments done at home in the weeks following the class. At first, I found it a little frustrating to work with. I was getting gloss medium all over my hands and it wouldn't wash off. The answer to that dilemma was latex gloves. And the more I played with the fusion techniques, I was hooked.

 What is fusion collage? I will briefly outline the steps involved in this method of collage done without liquid adhesives, as pioneered by artist Jonathan Talbot. See also his book, Collage: A New Approach (Talbot, 2001).

 The first step in making a fusion collage involves the usual cutting out of pieces you would like to incorporate into your collage. You pre-coat both sides of these pieces or pages with a glossy acrylic gel medium. After they have dried and you have figured out where you want them to go on your canvas, wood panel or other substrata, you are ready to start the fusion process. You also give the surface a good coat of gloss medium. Then you plug in a tacking iron. When it is hot, it is time to start "ironing" your pieces down into place. You may have to do this in stages, depending how complicated your design is. But wait! Before you start ironing, you need a silicone sheet to place face down on the substrata as a barrier between the heat of the iron and the glossy pieces. (You can buy the silicone sheets from Talbot Arts.) As you run the iron over the silicone sheet, it melds the pieces to the substrata. No more air bubbles, a frequent problem in laying papers down with wet gloss. After the composition is done, you are ready to varnish it as desired.

 

I created the largest collage I have ever made using this method. Done on a 16 x 20" wood panel, it took weeks and was very rewarding. I gave it an impasto paint treatment on the border and several coats of satin varnish. Since I am submitting it to a National Collage Society juried show, I can not share that image here right now.

Fusion collage also works with fabric, but I haven't tried that yet. I am working on a large canvas now, another Victorian era piece. Fusion collage can be time consuming in some ways, with all the prep work necessary beforehand, but in other ways, it seems to save time in that everything gets adhered more easily. It seems like magic to me, and I am glad to have added this method to my bag of collage tricks.

4 Fusion collages
by Keddy Ann Outlaw
Bunnies (wood panel)
Para La Vida (canvas)
Vintage Ladies (wood panel)
Lady with Fan (canvas)

1 comment:

Collage said...

Interesting works, thanks.