Saturday, April 19, 2014

Only Connect: Ah, the Thrills of Collage...

 
I've been making postcard-sized collages for the annual National Collage Society Postcard Show. I love working small! I find I can use tiny bits that I've been saving. The show is a an annual non-juried event, to be held online this year for the first time. Members submit one 4 x 6 " collage and all will be shown. I look forward to seeing the postcards. The three shown here were among the contenders, but obviously I can not/should not publish the collage I am submitting beforehand. The one shown above is called 1, 8, 15, 22, 29.

 
I named this one High Tide, Low Tide. I love using maps in my collages.

 
And this one is: Tiger Lily. As you can see, I limited my colors to warm browns, reds, yellow and a little, green and black.
 
Making collages, I often think of the E. M. Forester quote found at the end of his novel, Howard's End, which I read in college: "Only connect! That was the whole of her sermon. Only connect the prose and the passion, and both will be exalted, and human love will be seen at its height. Live in fragments no longer. Only connect, and the beast and the monk, robbed of the isolation that is life to either, will die."
 
To be exact, there are two parts of this quote I especially relate to: "Only connect."  And "Live in fragments no longer." Someone recently asked me "Why collage?" My immediate response was that in collage, I find deep integration. Combining fragments into a new whole is deeply satisfying. It is a bit like quilting, which I also enjoy. But I find cut and paste work with various papers and some mixed media provides a faster form of satisfaction than sewing.
 
When I've gone too long without making collages, what a joy it is to sit down and rediscover its thrills: connecting images that were formerly disconnected. Working with color and shape as well as the inherent subject matter feels a bit like making picture poems. There are joyful times that lines, shapes or textures inter-connect as I play with the pieces. And though here I am praising the points of connection, I believe most collages have inherent disconnected elements as well, and that makes for a certain built-in paradoxical or (hopefully) eye-catching appeal. Collage exists in sort of an alternative universe or dreamtime. I have observed that often people do not take the art form of collage seriously. That is why I am glad for the existence of the National Collage Society. When the show goes live later this year, I will link to it here.
 
Happy Easter weekend!
 
PS: Here is the 2014 NCS Postcard Show
 
And here is my entry, titled Parts Unknown:
 
 

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